Quebec forces Uber legislation through, though insurance still unclear

Quebec forces Uber legislation through, though insurance still unclear

Quebec forces Uber legislation through, though insurance still unclear A controversial bill regulating ride-hailing services like Uber has passed in Quebec after the Liberal government forced a vote.

The now-controversial bill was initially supported by all sides, including the taxi industry, according to a CBC News report. However, Québec Solidaire retracted its support, saying the bill was too vague and would create two classes of taxi drivers. That, they say, is unfair to taxi drivers who hold permits, which can cost up to $200,000.

The new law would require “remunerated passenger transportation services” to obtain a tax permit, CBC News reported. Anyone who offered taxi transportation without one could face fines up to $25,000 – with fines of up to $50,000 for their company.

The Coalition Avenir Québec has also argued against the legislation, although from a different perspective. They say it will hurt Quebec consumers by limiting their options if Uber is forced out of the province. And CAQ’s opposition in turn sparked its own protest by up to 1,000 Montreal taxi drivers, CBC News reported.

Taxi drivers say it’s unfair that Uber isn’t held to the same rules as traditional taxi companies, including driver background checks, vehicle requirements, and commercial insurance.


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