Morning Briefing: Insurance body calls for flood risk indicators for real estate

Morning Briefing: Insurance body calls for flood risk indicators for real estate

Morning Briefing: Insurance body calls for flood risk indicators for real estate Insurance body calls for flood risk indicators for real estate
Real estate listings should include a flood risk indicator to allow buyers to more easily assess the risk. The call is being made by the Association of British Insurers which will hold its Biennial Conference this week. The body has conducted a survey of 2000 adults which found that 90 pent would be in favor of the information being included in property listings. The proposal is that a ‘traffic light’ system would be used to show low, medium and high risk of flooding for every property. The ABI also says that real estate lawyers should specifically research flood risk on behalf of their clients. ABI director general Huw Edwards commented: “"With one in six homes at risk of flooding, we need to make thinking about flood risk as much part of the home buying process as school catchment areas and transport links. At the moment, information on whether a property is at risk of flooding comes too late.”
 
Manulife, Sun Life among new forum members
Two Canadian insurers are among four new members of the Global Insurance Chief Compliance Officers Forum. Manulife and Sun Life have been accepted into the forum which was founded earlier this year to share global best practice, educate stakeholders on the role of compliance and to participate in its future development. The forum is run by PwC and also welcomes Pan-Asian firm AIA and Spain’s Assicurazioni Generali as new members. Manulife will be represented by Kevin J. Cloherty, Sun Life by Paul Petrelli.
 
Physicians lack trust in health insurers says survey
Physicians broadly mistrust health insurance companies and say they even interfere with physicians’ ability to provide high-quality patient care, according to new results from the ReviveHealth Payor Trust Index which polled more than 600 primary care and specialist physicians across the country. Physicians said they have the least trust in UnitedHealthcare and Humana and the most trust in local Blue Cross Blue Shield Plans. Likewise, physicians deemed local BlueCross BlueShield plans best at enabling the delivery of high-quality care, and indicated United was the worst.  Trust was measured based on metrics such as physicians’ perspectives on a health plan’s efforts to honor its commitments, honestly and accurately represent itself and its intentions.